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Matter

Matter does not exist.

Most people would probably reject that statement. To show why it is true, we need to take a trip through time and space, starting with the distant past and proceeding to the very small.

An element is a substance that can not be broken down to a finer structure and still retain its defining properties. Conventional historians will tell you that people used to believe that matter consisted of four fundamental elements: Fire, Earth, Air, and Water. Supposedly this was all there was. If you broke down any matter -- trees, stones, animals, etc. -- you eventually arrived at one or more of these four elements. The academics make this statement with an air of superiority, believing we know better today. They're wrong about their perception of the ancients but we'll get back to that later.

As science grew more sophisticated, the number of elements that composed matter gradually increased. Dirt wasn't just Earth, for example, but was composed of iron and other substances. Most of those substances -- oil, for example -- are actually compounds, not elements in the modern sense. The significance of "element" periodically took on new meaning as knowledge of matter grew.

It was a step forward though not a very big step. Taking another step and looking deeper with microscopes, the known substances and compounds were found to consist of molecules. Oil, for example, consists primarily of hydrocarbons, a combination of hydrogen and carbon. The microscope couldn't resolve anything smaller than molecules so nothing smaller could possibly exist. A big step forward, though, yes?

No. The journey has only just begun. The details are not relevant to this account (and can be found in any science history book) but it was eventually learned that molecules consisted of even smaller things called atoms. The atom is indeed the smallest thing that can be defined as an element. However it is not the smallest thing that can be defined as a particle, or "solid matter." You couldn't tell that to the science comunity at the time, though. As with those who came before, "If I can't see it, it doesn't exist." Little did they know that what they could see didn't exist.

Using technologically advanced equipment and the power of deductive reasoning, the atom was disassembled to reveal protons, neutrons, and electrons. Finally (it was thought) we knew everything there was to know about the structure of matter. There couldn't possibly be anything smaller. (Where have we heard that before?)

The story diverges here into many sub-plots as smaller particles began to appear with increasing regularity. First it was just one, then a few. Soon there were particles popping up everywhere. Quarks, muons, pions, mesons... it was getting difficult to keep track of them all. A common thread that ran through the discoveries was that most were considered to be particles in the classic sense, i.e. solid matter.

Scientists were getting dizzy. Their smug self-assurance that they knew all there was to know began to evaporate like a raindrop in the Gobi. They finally began to wonder just how deep this rabbit hole went. To make things even more complicated, the question arose as to the very nature of matter in the first place. At the time it was believed that everything in existence consisted of either particles or waves. Matter fell into the particle category and energy was a waveform (sound waves, heat waves, light waves, etc).

The problem was that once you got down to the size of an atom, it became difficult to tell which was which. The electron was found to exhibit properties of both a particle and a wave. (Do a web search for the "double slit experiment?" or, if you're knowledgeable of it, add it to this wiki.)

They eventually realized that matter and energy are not two different things but are different manifistations of the same thing. All matter and all energy forms are vibratory in nature, which is to say they are waves.

But what exactly is waving? The answer to that takes us back to the general misconception that the ancients viewed existence as consisting of four basic elements. Actually, they recognized five, the fifth being the aether. The problem with the aether was tht few in the science community believed it existed. Experiments (such as the Michelson-Morley? experiment) seemed to rule out the possibility. (That experiment was both flawed and misinterpreted but that's another story and is open for addition to this wiki.)

In any event, the final conclusion was that matter, as such, is an illusion. There is really no such thing as "solid" matter. All matter is ultimately vibration. And vibration (sound), being the fundamental building block that Consciousness uses to create existence, is what this website is all about.

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Page last modified on February 06, 2017, at 09:44 PM